Comments (20)
Djphoenix
Djphoenix

Good and thoughtful comments from Boyce. Overall, I enjoyed the movie. The idea of the women peeing when in the air was a bit much for me.

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Djphoenix
Djphoenix

Angela Rye is an attorney and the former executive director and general counsel to the Congressional Black Caucus for the 112th Congress, not just someone who is into the Congressional Black Caucus. I would have thought that someone like Boyce would be more informed, but am not surprised that he wasn't given his general attitude toward Black woman. Whether one agrees with Black folks participating in such institutions, it is still important to know what they are. He often shares stories about his girls to establish his credibility/love for females, but his comments ultimately show something different.

Fluffy
Fluffy

Bottom line is that everything black people put in the cinema can't be Malcolm X and MLK, Jr. This movie was funny. It was a comedy. It was a movie. Nothing more and nothing less. It's not that serious. Adults can choose to interpret whatever they want however they want. This movie was not meant for children or to be a political editorial. There are more important issues to focus on. Life is serious enough. After a while you were just rambling.

BoyceWatkins
BoyceWatkins

Editor

I heard that the movie is pretty good. My message and concerns are the same, but I will give it a chance when it comes out on video

Gigia
Gigia

Yes it made me uncomfortable as well....I laughed throughout the entire movie and shed some tears during the end! Excellent Queen and Jada! Thanks for giving me a lot of sunshine on a Sunday afternoon....Love You Ladies!

AliJamal
AliJamal

I am so sick of the "it's just entrainment" statement. We are not in a position as black Americans, Afrikan descendants, Afrikan people, whatever you choose to call us, to allow movies like this to exist. If you work with our little girls (and boys) on a day-to-day basis like I do, you'd understand full well why this cannot happen! I don't care if men do this kind of crap, women are better than that, the mother's of this Earth, the ultimate leaders (insert a little Maat philosophy if you please). Get your freak on if you choose, have fun if you choose, but to put it out there like this is completely irresponsible. It feeds DIRECTLY into the same stereotypes that women hate! Black Girls Rock, right? And, yes, I saw the movie. I want a refund.

SheSpeaksTruth
SheSpeaksTruth

I saw the movie and it wasn't bad... It was about black women loving themselves, one another,
their families, and their careers. It was also about how loyal to black men we (black women) are even when the loyalty is not reciprocated. At the end of the movie, the main character even found a strong, intelligent, employed black man who adored her and respected her as the strong black woman she was. They talked a lot about diseases.... opposite of the white movies you see that obsess over sex! it was also a comedy and the humor was just right. All in all, it was not a set back to black women at all. If anything, it was a break from the norm of our day to day struggles.. Anyway, that's just my opinion. I give the movie 5 stars!!! Great job ladies #girlstrip

RiiRii
RiiRii

The movie is not out in Illinois yet. DeeVine. Watch Sex and the City then make your decision. What I'm saying is that you cannot do one of the sexes without including the other unless you are referring to MSM or WSW. WSW as far as I know, will not give you AIDS (Unless of course one of the females have had sex with a man at some point. There is nothing you can do about the 16 or 17 y/o females and their "desires". If they are going to be into sex,I believe most of the sexually active at that age has already done more that what we desire. This is the topic of Mr. Boyce's dissertation. But you have your opinion and I have mine so, never the twain shall meet. Have a wonderful day. djakarta - I agree with you whole heartedly. You have expressed my opinion again, how do you make a decision based on a trailer? You do this not knowing the full story and can possibly cause the movie producers, actors and actresses not to make the money they could have before Negative "Propaganda" was put out. We profess to want to help out brothers and sisters and then we do what Winneratlife and DeeVine say. They are not going to go see the movie. I MAKE UP MY OWN MIND. I'm for the sisters.

djakarta
djakarta

Overall it was entertaining and probably not as harmful as some of us are making it out to be. Making us, black women, feel bad about every portrayal of ourselves can be harmful if pushed to a certain degree. We must be careful of unfairly shaming each other in our own community.

djakarta
djakarta

I saw the movie and I get some of the points that Boyce is making, however, I was listening to the video the black married ladies made and they only saw the trailer. It is important to see/read for yourself and then have an informed discussion about the topic rather than watch a trailer and speak solely on that. It takes away from the weight of your arguments as some of them will be simply irrelevant to those of us who have seen the film and know that certain assumptions just are not true.There is character development of the women, there is an underlying story of sisterhood and friendship. There is a portrayal of a budding potentially healthier relationship after a bad break up and the movie shows an uptight single mom of 2 who has dedicated most of her life letting loose and having some much needed fun for a change. The comedian is the character who acts in a very crass and promiscuous way although we don't ever actually see her close the deal with anyone.

Winneratlife23
Winneratlife23

Don't intend.to. Wish we could make films about std's and it's effect on the african american community. especially the youth..

BoyceWatkins
BoyceWatkins

Has anyone seen the movie yet? What did you think?

Deevine
Deevine

^not want

Deevine
Deevine

RiiRii, that's part of the problem, the teens think they know more than us.(I'm in the 50 club). No one is saying that all Black females will digress by watching the movie, but its not the greatest example. As I previously stated I get your point that it takes 2 to tango, but the men are not the focus of this commentary. I've never seen Sex and the City. The bigger issue is some women are finding themselves in an "alone" situation when they choose not to protect themselves from pregnancies, having unwanted babies and struggling to raise them as single moms. I can relate to not being promiscuous nor being a prude, as I knew early on that I did want to be a teen mom. Friends and family wrangled with that issue and I was more responsible than that. I know single women with degrees that have 4 or 5 children by multiple men. Where is their logic? It shows that one can be book smart, but not have common sense.

RiiRii
RiiRii

And, I disagree with you as well. Those same 17 or 18 years old young ladies probably know more about the subject that eiither you or I. I assure you, I am older than you and have never been promiscuous and at the same time, neither have I been a prude. While you say that the "Male issue is a different subject for another conversation, these women are not promiscuous in an "alone" situation. Again, I ask, with whom are they being promiscuous. My problem with your outlook or take on the movie is what you feel Hollywood is doing this just to Black Women. On the sujbect of promiscuity, Sex and the City was a long standing White Promiscuous TV series and a movie. The fact that There is a rise in the AIDS population, we cannot simply say this is a Black Female situation. There was just an article done that statesthat the rise in new AIDS case is in the Southern States show that the rise is among gay men. I googled the web and asked what race and sex had the Highest increase in new AIDS cases: RESULTS ---From highest to lowest White MSM, Black MSM, Hispanice MSM and then Black Hetero Sexual Women - Black Hetereo men. So please leave these sister alone and let them make money. Black Women are the most educated of all groups of all races in this country (so you know I have a Masters Degress and another post graduate degree). I say this just to say that most of us, Black Women, are smart to look at a movie for what it is and, smart enough to teach our younger sisters as well. We do understand that some will slip through the cracks and we have to try hard to catch them before they go completely through. Speaking on promiscuity is fine - deciding that a movie will do it well.???????????.

Deevine
Deevine

@RiiRii The movie is entitled "Girls Trip", not Guys Trip. Dr. Boyce is dealing with the topic at hand, not deflecting it to deal with guys who are a whole other issue. You bring up valid points, but it's a different discussion for anothet time. The word promiscuous seems to have struck a nerve with you. This fits the behavior that is being shown. A company promotes their movie with a trailer. This is what a person bases their decision to see or not to see it on. It is all the info you have at the moment. Based on it, I will not go see the movie. I definitely wouldnt want impressionable 17 or 18 year olds to see it and think they should sspire to this. Their focus should be on choosing a college or other path to secure their future. Now I will view Dr. Boyce's commentary.

DaString
DaString

Dr. Boyce, first let me say that I often find your opinions and commentary on Black culture insightful, providing a unique perspective that generally challenges my personal views on many issues impacting the Black community. Although I find myself disagreeing with you on some matters, it never compels me to stop watching your videos and hearing your point of view.

Here’s the rub:
Over the past few years, many positive Black movies, especially historical pieces, have been produced and marketed with just as much fervor as Girls Trip. I remember not being able to watch anything without an ad of Hidden Figures popping up on the television. Movies like Selma, The Butler, The Birth of a Nation, Race, Twelve Years a Slave, Fences, and Dear White People were heavily marketed to the Black community, some even found their way on billboards in urban areas. If you examine that spectrum of movies that took us from enslavement to the Civil Rights era to films like Dear White People, which is now a Netflix series, I think our films work at telling stories about the Black experience in its entirety. I’m not 100% convinced that Girls Trip is pushing sexual irresponsibility and promiscuity, but being a Black woman with a lot of Black, single, female friends, oftentimes with children, many struggle with feelings of guilt when they desire to take “me time.” It takes a lot for them to actually pull away and do things for their own personal pleasure and enjoyment because the majority of the time they are taking care of everybody else. So, the concept of Girls Trip is a necessary one. Perhaps what it conveys to the audience may prove to be simply subjective. It may be more risqué than Waiting to Exhale and How Stella Got Her Groove Back, but there’s certainly a semblance in the message.

Secondly, Will Packer, the producer of Girls Trip is a Black man, with movies like Think Like a Man, Three Can Play That Game, and About Last Night to his credit. In other words, this style of comedy is his genre. He’s been exploring Black sexuality in a comedic way for years. Malcolm D. Lee is the director, who also happens to be a Black man. And look here, Kenya Barris, creator of Black-ish, another Black man, is one of the writers of Girls Trip. As you and I both know, no film can happen until somebody sits down and writes a script. So, in your commentary, I think it’s essential that you state that the film has a producer, director, and writer who are all Black men.

Now what I find to be problematic, when it comes this kind of commentary on Black film and entertainment, is this tendency to rely on these “white people doing this” conspiracy theories, as if Black filmmakers and actors/actresses are not conscious or don’t have a conscience. And that somehow any Black person in the arts and entertainment industry, who’s not promoting a “woke” message by our standards, is somehow allowing themselves to be a tool for “white people” who have no other purpose or interest but to portray us in the most negative light. Or, that these same entertainment professionals have “sold out” to the white dollar. I believe that it’s both audacious and assumptive to peg individuals, who are gaining ground in Hollywood as immoral, irresponsible, sell-outs who lack good judgment about the projects they want to commit themselves to.

Additionally, the research you provided did not address the fact that “Injection drug use is the second leading cause of HIV infection for African American women and the third leading cause for African American men…” (blackaids.org). In other words, this idea that gay and/or bisexual men are the primary cause of transmitting AIDS to unsuspecting Black women fails to address the issue of heterosexual, intravenous drug users. It seems like you take far greater issue with Black gay and/or bisexual men and not necessarily sexually liberated Black women. You do know there are celibate gay men, right? You do know that there are gay men in monogamous relationships? The idea that gay/bi men are just running around having unprotected sex like rabbits, without any other priorities is a negative stereotype being perpetuated that I can only hope, one day, loses energy.

This is my final thought as it pertains to your comment about “Black men in Hollywood have to be gay” in order to “make it.” When I think of the top Black actors in Hollywood, names like Samuel Jackson, Don Cheadle, Terrence Howard, Will Smith, Forrest Whitaker, Morgan Freeman, Laurence Fishburne, Denzel Washington, Kevin Hart, Idris Elba, Danny Glover, Cuba Gooding, Jr., and Jamie Foxx, all come to mind. As far as we know, these are Black, heterosexual men who have had highly successful careers without falling prey to this so-called “white Hollywood conspiracy” to feminize Black men or convert them to homosexuality. I would love for you to provide supporting evidence of Black men in Hollywood whose careers have excelled because they have either allowed “white Hollywood” to feminize them or a homosexual lifestyle has propelled their careers.

Respectfully,
D

RiiRii
RiiRii

Sooooooo, Women are promiscuous and the men they are promiscuous with, are What? Black Women with AIDS may be increasing, of that there is no doubt. But why not include in the article thoughts of men (wanting what they call raw) naked sex. Why don't we discuss the fact that when some of these men get out of prison they don't mention the fact that they've been raped by other men (with aids) and please lets' not forget the one who are still on the down-low. I personally think that everyone should practice safe sex but I also think people should stop smoking and using drugs. So please get off the box about women who may be being "promiscuous" but who may be praticing safe sex. Let's include men in promiscuous. White women are promiscuous in movies also. You, in my opinion, chose the wrong part of the movie. Its not even out yet. This is about Friends being friends. You would have to understand how women talk to each other. The trailer is not enough to make a decision about this movie.

BoyceWatkins
BoyceWatkins

For the record, I have tremendous respect for the women who are in this film. I just believe that a little critical thinking will lead us to be thoughtful about the kinds of messages that are being mass-promoted to black people. Black women lead the nation in new HIV infections, so we have to wonder if there is a consequence to white Hollywood using black faces to promote behavior that is not to the benefit of black people. But feel free to disagree or provide alternative points of view, it's entirely acceptable to do that.


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