Electric Car Major Headache: Waiting Hours for Charging Bay then Hrs to Charge

-edited

A trip from LA to Las Vegas and back takes 8 hours by a gas-powered car but 13 hours by an electric vehicle.

The electric vehicle grand vision may flounder on something most drivers take for granted: a quick pit stop.

The inconvenient truth of electric vehicles is they are terribly inconvenient to own and operate. Most cars need a charge after 200 to 250 miles traveled.

Charging them requires finding a charging station, and then an open bay.

The New York Times reports L.A. to Vegas and Back by Electric Car: 8 Hours Driving; 5 More Plugged In.

The NYT author, Ivan Penn, drove a Chevrolet Bolt from LA to Las Vegas, a 540-mile round trip that many people make regularly.

Penn reports that in addition to eight hours on the road, he spent close to five and a half hours charging the car. That's about 41% charging time.

It could have been much worse. "We always found a charger available, though more than once we got the last one, and drivers arriving after us had to wait," said Penn.

Thus, what was 5.5 hours could easily have been 8 hours. All it would have taken was one nasty wait. Tesla owners have been known to wait an hour or more for a charger to open up. And Tesla owners can use either Tesla stations or public stations. The reverse is not true.

The United States has about 24,000 public charging stations, with an average of fewer than three charging posts. By comparison, there are about 150,000 gas stations, some with dozens of pumps.

Will the number of charging stations increase as fast as electric vehicles?

I don't know but the alleged saving over gasoline is not as good as reported.

Charging costs an average cost $10 for about 200 miles, depending on the car, That's about about half the typical cost of gasoline for that distance, according to AAA.

"Our experience was not as economical: We spent about $67 on electricity, perhaps $10 less than we might have on gas," says Penn. Of course, no one can predict with any reasonable degree of accuracy, future electric costs or future gasoline prices.

Is this really "green"?

Debates on environmental friendliness rage, but even if this is an environmentally friendly setup, it's ridiculously inconvenient to spend 8 hours or even 5.5 hours charging a car for an 8-hour trip.

Regulations

There are no standards for plugs, fast chargers, or number of bays. Regulations have not caught up, but Mountlake Terrace, Washington, a Seattle suburb, is forcing developers to put up charging stations.

  1. Signage. Each charging station space shall be posted with signage indicating the space is only for electric vehicle charging purposes. Days and hours of operation shall be included if time limits or tow-away provisions are to be enforced.
  2. Clearance. Charging station equipment mounted on pedestals, light posts, bollards or other devices shall be a minimum of 24 inches clear from the face of curb.
  3. Charging Station Equipment. Charging station outlets and connector devices shall be no less than 36 inches or no higher than 48 inches from the top of surface where mounted, and shall contain a retraction device and/or a place to hang permanent cords and connectors sufficiently above the ground or paved surface.
  4. Charging Station Equipment Protection. When the electric vehicle charging station space is perpendicular or at an angle to curb face and charging equipment, adequate equipment protection, such as wheel stops or concrete-filled steel bollards shall be used.
  5. Maintenance. Charging station equipment shall be maintained in all respects, including the functioning of the charging equipment. A phone number or other contact information shall be provided on the charging station equipment for reporting when the equipment is not functioning or other problems are encountered.

Required Number of Stations

When Do EV Vehicles Make Sense?

  1. Currently, nowhere, from a cost standpoint. People buy EVs or hybrids on the questionable belief they are doing something for the environment.
  2. For those who very seldom drive at all and for those whom walking, public transportation, or Uber is a viable option, no car of any kind makes economic sense. However, for those who demand the convenience of having a car, the points made below apply.
  3. If and when the cost of an EV is no more than the cost of a gas-powered vehicle (factoring in gas, insurance, life of car, maintenance costs) EVs become practical for those who seldom if ever drive more than 150 mile or so before a known lengthy stop that also happens to have a charger. For most, the charging station needs to be home or work.
  4. Until batteries charge as fast or nearly as fast fueling a gas-powered vehicle or readily available battery swapping stations exist, EVs will not make sense for a big percentage of drivers.

Number 3 may happen soon, or not, but 3 likely precedes 4 by a lengthy period.

Those who live in a big metropolitan area who seldom if ever drive outside that area, who also demand the convenience of having their own car whether it makes economic sense might find EVs practical in the near future. Many millions of people meet this description.

In general, ownership and inconvenience costs need to drop before EV ownership takes off. For many, we are a decade away unless and until there are readily available super-fast charging or swapping stations.

For those living in cities, I expect outright ownership rates will drop as self-driving Uber and new rental opportunities catch on.

Mike "Mish" Shedlock

Comments (146)
No. 1-50
Menaquinone
Menaquinone

Ultimately the bloodsuckers of the government will tax electricity to replace gasoline taxes. When that happens electricity as fuel becomes uncompetitive with oil. The cost of replacing batteries and electric motors are yet to be known. Most likely the manufacturers won't offer replacements. Planned obsolescence is the Detroit business plan. That explains why the Post Office, Fedex, and UPS purchase their truck engines from General Dynamics, et.al. A quality designed engine operates trouble free for well over 500,000 miles.

Six000mileyear
Six000mileyear

The greatest threat to EV's and hybrids is sourcing rare Earth magnets from a communist nation that could exert its power by withholding the magnets from any nation that offends it.

Grumblenose
Grumblenose

A couple of countries (Sweden and Germany) have done studies that show that electric vehicles produce more CO2 emissions over their entire life-cycle than conventional cars. EVs: more emissions, more expensive, more inconvenient. Why the heck are people buying them?

thimk
thimk

America has a penchant for trucks and suvs . they like the size, and the ability to haul cargo/tow/off road stuff . It will be a while before EVs crack that market .

vboring
vboring

EVs aren't great for road trips. Every other day of the year, you start the day with a "full tank." It is extremely convenient.

If you sign up for a low cost overnight electricity rate, it saves money.

People who frequently go on road trips can buy plug in hybrids. They have enough battery for the commute and have an engine for road trips.

Sechel
Sechel

can't see the case for them now. but its a certainty they will improve and it won't take decades

Jojo
Jojo

This is why H fuel cells are the real future of transportation! Might want to read:

robjay
robjay

What a skewed story! I own a one year old Tesla model 3 long range battery (325 miles). In one year I waited only once for 10 minutes to get a Tesla charger. Each Tesla supercharger station has at least 8 chargers. It takes 45 minutes to fully charge my car with version 2 superchargers and version 3 chargers are now rolling out. This article does NOT apply to Tesla cars since they have larger batteries, even Tesla standard battery, is bigger than Chevy bolt.

As for environment, EV on every stat are better for environment, your stats vs gas cars are incorrect and are not apples to apples comparison. You provide misleading information. And your negativity is showing and sounds like a gas lobbyist.

Outside of the US, which is dominated by gas companies, gas lobbyists and government has fanatics, you find much more true government support and statistics.

I will continue to pay $10.02, at the highest rate, to fully charge my 325 mile battery car. I will drive knowing I AM helping the environment. I will ENJOY a spectacular performing car with features no other car has, including SAFETY, as long as you adher to proper driving. In addition since there are FEW moving parts, this car requires minimal maintenance and cost to run vs any gas car.

Happy Driving Robert

elictronic
elictronic

I really enjoy the article is about a Chevy Volt. However all images and discussion seem to be around Tesla? Seems kind of click-baity at least image wise. As a note I am a Tesla owner as well, and I have really enjoyed my maintenance savings. Screw the Sales as a Service models that all the other dealers can't get out of.

Nautilus
Nautilus

Your ignorance is showing. Many Tesla's can make the 269 mile trip on a full charge already. Even the base Model 3 only requires 1 stop, for 30 minutes or less to "top off" with sufficient power to make the trip. A nice stop at Eddie World for a snack or dinner, bathroom break and 18 Tesla Superchargers. Your ICE "advantage" is mere minutes. With upcoming V3 Supercharging, there will be enough range added in the time it takes for a bathroom break. Welcome to the future.

Davetech
Davetech

Yeah...so the original article by the NYT Reporter is what we would generally call a "Hit Piece"...designed to attempt to show things (EVs) in a bad light. The Headline for this article...is even worse...they DID NOT wait hours for a charging bay...PERIOD. Terrible use of clickbait.

  1. MOST people drive (average commute) less than 35 miles per day ROUND TRIP.

A better headline might be: "Gasoline powered car owners CAN'T charge at home...or at work...or at a destination charger... So gas car owners are FORCED to spend hours per year pulling into smelly gas stations and pumping gas, instead of a few seconds every night at home."

People charge their EVs just like they do their phones...mostly at night..mostly while they are sleeping. This article is just plain silly. When a majority of people start commuting from LA to Vegas and back (they DON'T)...instead of commuting less than 35 miles per day average (they DO)...this article might have a couple relevant points...until then it's a Hit Piece.

If you are SHORT Tesla, you should really put that in your article. If not...you probably should get on it...since it's obvious that's the thought process.

It's VERY SIMPLE:

  1. EVs are The Future. (It's already begun...in case you missed / are missing it.)
  2. The % of EVs sold will go up DRAMATICALLY Every. Single. Year. Just like Smart Phones did after they got "really smart".
  3. In addition to being way more environmentally friendly to have EVs instead of Gas Cars (and Gas Stations and OIL / Gas Refineries and Oil Drilling Rigs / Platforms, etc.) EVs do NOT..
  4. OIL STARTS WARS. OIL COMPANIES / OIL COUNTRIES / Advocates of OIL Regularly and Routinely start WARS over OIL. TRILLIONS of DOLLARS of money BURNT, Millions of LIVES LOST and Property Destroyed.
  5. The WARS in #4 are worse than any small issue in building EVs. Any ONE war would simply be worse than ALL EVs made to date.
  6. Wanna bet that there will be another WAR over OIL?? Hmmm...where has the US sent its Carrier Group??????? Look out IRAN!! You're NEXT!! OIL Strikes AGAIN!

Please at least identify yourself as a TESLA Bear / Short / EV Hater if you are...otherwise, this is just terrible research and far from accurate.

martin archer
martin archer

Anyone so dumb that they drive a Bolt instead of a Tesla should be forced to wait even if a charger is available.

BilleeBe
BilleeBe

Enevate in Irvine, Calif., is developing technology to reduce EV battery charging times. Check out www.enevate.com

Phil88
Phil88

The NYT is lying by omission because they receive so much ad money from oil company interests and fossil fuel car companies. They completely ignored the simple fact that Teslas can drive LA to Vegas with zero stops or, if they stop to charge, actually Supercharge faster than it takes to grab a bite or go to the bathroom. This is proven by the many hundreds of posts on the Tesla forums. Don't fall for the dishonest FUD nonsense.

justacrow
justacrow

Two facts to add to moderate some of the perspective shown in this article.

  1. I recently drove my Tesla Model 3 on my first long range trip from Vermont to Pennsylvania, optimally a 7h45min trip in a gas vehicle, took about 9 hours down, and 8 hours 30 min back. On a trip like that, you have to stop for the bathroom / coffee anyway. What I learned is to make those stops happen at places where there's a supercharger (there were about 10 different choices on my route), and, when you have lunch, have a sit-down lunch instead of just grab-and-go. The slower pace of the trip was actually somewhat relaxing, but, yes, slower. I haven't tried it again since Tesla improved charging times by 25% on my car.
  2. It's hard to find a good source on the net impact of electric vehicles. I'm a big believer in the scientific method, and I found this work by the union of concerned scientists persuasive: https://www.ucsusa.org/clean-vehicles/electric-vehicles/life-cycle-ev-emissions
PeteF
PeteF

The situation is even worse. I live in a condo complex. Number of charging bays:0. I wouldn’t even have the option of starting the day with a full charge.

Getagrip
Getagrip

The NYT author used a Chevy Bolt. The only practical long range EV is a Tesla because only Tesla invested in a dedicated high speed charging network. I periodically drive 300 miles between cities through the rural mountains of WV and MD, never waited for a Supercharger and stop for about 15 minutes to top up midway and for a bathroom/coffee break. EV charging at home has no incremental cost (solar covers annual house and EV needs) and charging on the road is still cheaper than gas. Crowding of chargers might be a bit different on the West Coast, but EV living in my part of the east is trivial and the car does most of the driving (under supervision of course).

Wagner12
Wagner12

Do I understand correctly that NYT author went on a road trip with Chevy Bolt and then extrapolated Chevy Bolt observations to Tesla without ever taking the same road trip with a Tesla?

Really, does no one with 2 grams of brain allocated for critical thinking see what is wrong with such extrapolation?

Some hints:

  1. Teslas charge at 150KW (soon 250KW). Chevy Bolt is stuck at 50KW charging.
  2. Teslas have range of 300+ miles. Chevy Bolt 238 miles.
  3. Teslas preconditions their batteries if you set it in navigation system. Chevy Bolt does not do that. Ramp up curve for charging is worse for Bolt.
  4. Teslas have many superchargers that you see real time in Navigation System and see how busy each of them are. Just stop at the one that is less busy and skip the busy ones. I really don't know how one can do something similar with Bolt.
  5. Teslas can charge in non-Tesla stations. Weheras bolts can't charge in Tesla stations.

Based on my experience Model 3 is just as fast as gasoline car on 1000mi/day road trips if

  1. you know how to charge it properly (don't charge to 100%, charge enough to get to next few chargers)
  2. can align restroom and food breaks with charging stops
  3. book a hotel with Tesla Destaination charger, Chargepoint charger or just regular power outlet. There are plenty of such hotels nowadays.
Rwg
Rwg

As a Model 3 owner, we've done an 8,000 mile road trip from Oregon to Maryland and back again. No problems with the charging and with 310 mile range it's nice to take a break every 3 to 5 hours. It was the most relaxing cross country drive we've done. Your opinions come across loud and clear but will not stand the test of time.

ronfellow
ronfellow

That was a very misleading article. The $67 cost is if you're using commercial charge stations. For most people most times charging at home cost a lot less than that. Also the picture showed a Tesla but Tesla with longer range batteries and faster and more readily available charging stations will do A LOT better than that.

SteveWin1
SteveWin1

This is a crap article. Most hotels allow you to charge while you sleep. My Tesla model 3 can make the first leg of this trip without stopping and you just plug in at the hotel and have a full charge whenever you want to leave. Unless you were planning on doing this entire round trip in a single go, my EV would be faster, because I don't ever have to stop to refuel. What's the range on your ICE? 500 miles? You won't make it to Vegas and back without getting gas. I'll spend 5 seconds plugging my car in before going into the hotel and you'll have to go out of your way to find a gas station, tell the machine you don't want a receipt, swipe your card so some scammer can steal your number and then stand there and smell fumes. Unless you're doing ridiculously long trips on a regular basis, EVs are faster and more convenient. They refuel while you sleep and take the same effort as plugging your phone in each night. If you do have to go cross-country, you just stop to charge when you'd be eating anyway. Unlike gas stations, supercharging stations usually have good food around so you eat while you fuel and literally by the time you're done eating you're charged. You can't get more convenient than that. People just don't like change. This is the future. It's much better. I hate driving my ICE now.

Paul370
Paul370

This article is referencing a Chevy Bolt . Who's overall battery and motor tech are a minimum of 12 years behind the current leader of Electric Vehicles --> Tesla. I own a 2019 Model 3 and travel almost 400 miles round trip one day a week for work... It currently costs me an average of $0.028 / mile. I have never waited for an open Bay at a Supercharger and regularly charge my vehicle in 45 minutes. This article is painting all EV's with a BROAD brush and is very comical for anyone who owns a Tesla.

Rwg
Rwg

Oh and by the way it cost about $150 one way and $205 the other way for electricity. Compare that to gas prices.

DaveG1
DaveG1

I don't get this story. Buy a Long Range Tesla Model 3 and you get 325 miles of range. Charge for 40 minutes on your way to Vegas from LA (I dunno..have a meal after 4 hours of driving while you charge this one time?), and you've arrived at your destination. At your destination, charge up while you gamble. What's the problem here? That simulates how a normal person would drive any car going to Vegas. Also, there is no maintenance on an electric car, and when you're home in LA, you charge your vehicle at home...no gas station stops needed....ever.

Paul Rak
Paul Rak

The New York Times article referenced here is actually grossly incorrect and includes "data" that was purposefully falsified... Please read through the link from Cleantechnica's research into the article : NYTimes Spreads Misinformation About EVs — Let’s Clean Up The Mess June 22nd, 2019 by Dr. Maximilian Holland

Mish
Mish

Editor

Personally, I could not stand waiting a half hour let alone an hour.

Mish
Mish

Editor

It is humorous to see al the Tesla Defenders here.

Cost of a Tesla is not exactly cheap - cannot possibly pay for itself

Paul Rak
Paul Rak

Actually owning a Tesla is not as expensive as anybody would think here's a YouTuber story from this week https://youtu.be/kWvs5H32Oyc

Not that I would buy a Tesla, I own a Hyundai ioniq which is half the price

DaveG1
DaveG1

I think I read the story wrong. 540 miles round trip...you should only need to charge once in a Model 3...and do that at your destination. 325 mile range gets you there if you're fully charged from your home base. 325 miles more range at your destination.

pod0boq
pod0boq

what a crock.

For the people who drive 400 miles every single day - no, electrics aren't the best choice unless there's an 8 hour gap between drive times. For everyone else, yea, electrics are smarter and better for the environment. What, I suppose we should all own and drive moving vans every single day since we might need to move our household at a moment's notice?

Rokku
Rokku

Why are you posting a picture of a Tesla charging when its actually a Chevy Bolt having all the charging issues?

Greggg
Greggg

Human threshold for DC current is 42 volt. Tesla fully charged batteries produce 375 volts. Touch the wrong thing and you become a human welding electrode.

Ccfiiimd
Ccfiiimd

I have not written much on Facebook about a car I purchased about 8 months ago. I bought a Tesla Model 3. We liked it so much my wife got a blue Model 3 two months later. People ask me how do I like it, and the truth is I will NEVER buy a gasoline powered vehicle again.

“Clean” is how to describe this car in one word.

Clean, because there are no tailpipe emissions.

Clean, because I never stop for gas. It is always full every morning.

Clean, because electric is more efficient, cheaper and less polluting than gas.

Clean, because the motor has 2 moving parts and there is no oil to change.

Other great things about this American made car, is that it gets better with time. The software running the car is regularly updated wirelessly, like a smart phone. The auto park feature you can see here, was not part of the car when I bought it 8 months ago.

Another really cool aspect to this car is Autopilot. This feature is incredible and takes a lot of work out of driving. At this stage, the car can do all the driving on a freeway, including entering and exiting the freeway, maintaining and changing lanes, emergency braking to avoid collisions, slowing down to 0 if needed, speeding up as space opens up, and changing speed as speed limits vary. You have to see it to believe it.

Finally, people always ask about the range on these cars. Their standard range plus model 3 is rated at 240 mile. At 75 miles an hour on the interstate, you will get about 70% of that. Around town in stop and go traffic, the car regenerates energy and charges the battery as you slow down, 240 miles is very reasonable. When the weather is cold, the battery is less efficient and the range can decrease about 20-40%, depending on how cold it is. On road trips, the car will calculate your route and where to stop and for how long to charge the car at the Tesla Supercharger network the blankets the US, and extends into Canada and Mexico. I recommend all wheel drive and long range if you live where it snows frequently or travel on road trips.

If you are interested in a Model 3 or another Tesla, you basically buy them online. The Model 3 can now be bought for about $40,000, and this may seem like a lot, but you will save money on gas and maintenance, and there is a tax rebate of $3750, if you will pay that much in income taxes. If you order through this referral code, you will get up to 1000 miles in free supercharging though the end of the month. https://ts.la/carl76146

ashralis
ashralis

You don't actaully have to drive from LA to Las Vegas in an electric Chevy to know how it would go, sorry you had to experience that trouble! I would recommend using the electric vehicle for commuting, and if you need to do a road trip, I recommend renting a gas-powered car. Or flying. Too bad there isn't a bullet train.

Wisconsin EV
Wisconsin EV

As a Bolt owner for about 16 months and nearly 50,000 trouble free miles, i find this article skewed. No comments about the virtual lack of maintenance costs. To date, I've had to rotate my tires and replace the cabin air filter. That's it. And that's all I have to do for another 50,000 miles. Also not called out is that most owners have an ICE car so that they can go on longer trips. I have a 125 mile daily commute and going to full electric was a fantastic choice.

DrTomD
DrTomD

This is not at all realistic and likely written by someone who hasn't driven an EV. I live a the east coast and drive a Chevy Bolt. I have done round trips of 500 miles in a day and did not spend more than 2 hours charging (the chargers were free on I-95). It is very rare that the range of my Chevy Bolt is insufficient and with proper planning trips of 500 miles are readily doable.

K Solomon
K Solomon

Here is the scenario and situation where EV makes sense.

  1. Many sub urban households own multiple vehicles.
  2. These households account for a large percentage of SOV drivers on their daily commute into the workplace. Thus, for these primary household breadwinners, an EV makes sense. They can charge their EV back at their homes after the day's commute.
  3. These households can use their gasoline powered vehicles for their long vacations/trips.
GigiMargot
GigiMargot

Indeed, such a skewed story invoking a NYT biased article of a Chevy bolt experiment while showing a Tesla pic. No wonder readers can't decide if you're a Tesla short or big oil interest driven. In my opinion this can't be jotted down to ignorance or laziness in researching your subject so please tell us who's your master?

John Rader
John Rader

I recently drove almost ten times that distance from Portland to Los Angeles and back in my Tesla. It was barely over 10 hours of total charge time, which on a 2000 mile trip was mostly overnight while I was sleeping. There where only two stops, one in Eugene and one in Bakersfield that were somewhat longer than a normal rest stop in an ICE vehicle.

As other people have commented, this article is very clickbaity as you are describing a Bolt yet have pictured a Tesla. And as other people have commented when V3 supercharging becomes available my charge time of 10 hours from Portland Oregon to Los Angeles California and back will be cut down to less than 6 hours. 4 of those hours will be on chargers at the hotels I'm staying at.

At home by utilizing time of use, I'm paying less than $4 to fill up my car.

Most important, I'm not being constantly exposed to gasoline fumes. Since buying an electric car, my sense of smell has returned. I didn't even realize how much the smell of gasoline had disappeared into the background until I stepped into a Tesla.

I still own six ICE vehicles, mostly trucks, LPG, diesel and gas. The second that there is a viable electric alternative, I will be switching those out as well.

TeslaM3
TeslaM3

Tesla Model 3 owner here. This article is silly and inaccurate. I frequently choose the electric sedan over our gas powered SUV on family road trips.

We start with a full 325 mile charge, the GPS tells us when to pull off for a supercharger and how long to plug in, then we pop back on the highway and the car drives itself...We've never waited in line or felt like we were stuck. After hitting the bathroom, grabbing a coffee, and changing the baby, it's time to roll.

I'm actually taking it on a business trip tomorrow. She's plugged in tonight and just booked a hotel with free electric charging in their parking garage. I know there are about 6 superchargers on my route but don't plan to stop unless I need a bathroom or a bite. I'll arrive refreshed after Autopilot does most of the driving, take advantage of free power while at the hotel, and come out ahead on corporate milage reimbursement.

Tell me more about this major headache?!?

seattle phil
seattle phil

This is an unbelievably bad article. Not only does it represent one EV experience as the norm but completely ignores the leading EV, Tesla, and the supercharger network.

First, road trips are a very small percentage of almost every American's driving. Representing the road trip experience as the norm completely misrepresents the typical EV experience.

Second, had the author looked at Teslas, he would have seen that the 280 mile trip could have been done with one Supercharger stop for 20-30 minutes. While in LV, the Tesla could have been recharging while the driver was off doing other things. So, at the most it would be one hour extra for the round trip.

Thirdly, the reports of hour long waits at superchargers have been vastly overstated. There are several in California that have had some waits but they are the exception and no where near the norm. Tesla is continually adding Superchargers and upgrading ones that have crowding.

Fourth, the author fails to understand the power of charging networks. One of the reasons that Tesla is the leading EV is its supercharger network. People buy Teslas because of the Supercharger Network.

I could go on but will leave it at that.

Ev owner Matt
Ev owner Matt

So, first off this article is very biased. He is saying that because 1 person had trouble charging a vehicle from LA to LV, that all EVs take 5.5 hours to charge to cover 560 miles. This is not true. I own a Tesla model 3 and I can drive from LV to LA without stopping to charge. It would just take 40 minutes to charge up and make it back to LV. Also, charging only costs about $24 to drive from LA to Vegas and back. Which is about 1/3 the cost of gas. Again, this article is highly biased towards dinosaur burners.

Tesla S
Tesla S

Yet another badly researched and biased story desperately trying to make a case for cars that run on what’s left of the dinosaur era. Just like their energy source they are destined to go extinct soon. Mish failed to mention that most every EV owner charges at home overnight at a fraction of the cost of commercial charging stations, let alone the cost of gasoline. Full tank of electricity every morning. No more stops at dirty and smelly gas stations, oil drips in the garage, oil changes, etc. My first EV was an e-Golf with only 100 miles range. Even with that limited range I rarely had to use commercial chargers, while it certainly wasn’t a road trip wonder. However, my Tesla S85 is the best road trip car ever. 260 miles range, autopilot, built in Slacker Radio and free Supercharging thatbInjave yet to wait in line for. I gladly stop for a 30min snack every few hours. I’ve had many very European luxury and sports cars including Porsche 911, BMW M3 and M5, Audi A6 etc., and I would not trade my Model S for all of them combined. If you’re not blindly cheering for gas guzzlers you might find that this video adds perspective: https://youtu.be/7j0iaVmQKlQ Enjoy!

Evwesty
Evwesty

What is this 2015 ? EVs have come a long way in the last couple of years. I used to love mish but this poorly researched shit bait makes me reconsider this blog. Most EVs will go further than this and studies show are much better for the environment even if fueled by fossil fuels. About 50 % of gas gets turned into heat EVs convert 95% into motion.

Aladin_D
Aladin_D

Reporter forgot a important thing in calculating cost. Time is money. If driver is on a business trip, every hrs might cost hundreds dollar.

Tengen
Tengen

Obviously someone (Wagner?) linked Mish's article to an EV forum, hence the swarm of responses from new users. I don't have a dog in this fight since I don't care one way or the other about EVs, but it's amusing anyway.

I hope these enthusiasts take this opportunity to learn about the horrors of central banking and modern monetary theory. It's a far more important topic than the types of cars people drive, or debates about Elon Musk's sanity!

JavaMe
JavaMe

Ha! Speaking of Elon's sanity, his thoughts on MMT probably go something like this..."Central banks must implement MMT for the people now because everyone should be able to buy a Tesla if they want to..."

AOC agrees...

PismoPat
PismoPat

If you own a Tesla, none of this EV article applies. Since Tesla is the dominate EV car, the article does not apply to 80% of EVs. It's surprising how inaccurate the story is. I drove from Pismo Beach, CA to Las Vegas, 7 to 8 hours in a Gas car. In the Tesla, we stopped for lunch in Yermo and charged while having lunch and 15 minutes of charging in Primm. About 25 minutes was spent charging that otherwise would not have been spent. (Lunch and Primm.)

Top-GUN
Top-GUN

Obviously a lot of TESLA owners here that LOVE their cars.. I don't love my car anymore than I love my claw hammer or drill motor or lawn mower,,, it's just a tool... Can't imagine planning a trip based on where chargers are... All this business about planning bath breaks, hotels, restaurants... ridiculous... I take food with me, want to be able to take alternate routes and any old back road, and pull over where ever when ever.... Nice thing about gas and diesel is you can carry them around in any old milk carton or bucket if necessary.. As for bragging about autopilot,, that has nothing to do with tesla,, just another technology being developed and available in many vehicles... And the Tesla boys forget to mention the decrease in mileage when the Heating, Cooling, wipers etc are needed ... And of course we wouldn't be having this conversation if Uncle $ugar wasn't subsidizing this nonsense with My Tax Dollars,, (UnConstitutional subsidies BTW)