Europe's Shakespeare Response to Iran Sanctions: New Word "unisolationism

Europe is huffing and puffing and full of fury over Trump's Iran decision. The French even coined a new word.

Trump's decision to re-impose sanctions means a blanket ban on all new business with Iran, effective immediately. Existing operations have three to six months to be wound down.

The US's new ambassador to Germany, Richard Grenell, wasted no time poking a finger in the eyes of his host.

European leaders are calling President Trump’s decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear deal a potentially catastrophic mistake. One French diplomat is so furious, he even coined a new description of Trump’s view of the world: “unisolationism.”

The phrase is the brainchild of one of the most prominent European diplomats in the US, François Delattre, France’s ambassador to the United Nations. He told Karen DeYoung of the Washington Post that the Trump administration’s foreign policy was a dangerous “mix of unilateralism and isolationism” that he combined into “unisolationism.”

Sound and Fury

Europe's response to Trump's Iran move is just like a scene from Macbeth Act V:

"It is a tale. Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing."

What a bunch of blowhard wimps.

Mike "Mish" Shedlock

Comments
No. 1-17
Ambrose_Bierce
Ambrose_Bierce

In light of the new provocations between Israel and Iran in Syria, while the 800 lb Gorilla, Russia has consolidated its position, reminds one of Russian blowback during the Iraq war, when they supplied Iran with high tech air defenses. Trump may have just ordered a blustery retreat.

Stuki
Stuki

All productive actors (companies, as well as other organizations and individuals), in all parts of the world, will need to be more mindful of stealthifying their exterior surface. It’s just too darned easy for robbers to shake down gigantic, slow moving, obvious blobs of wealth with abandon.

Much tougher to be a thief when even large organizations appear to the outside largely as a network of unrelated entities spread across all manners of jurisdictions. Each of which has little in the way of obviously accessible loot for the crooks to steal. And which can hence fold under even light pressure; only to pop up in a different guise in another part of the globe in no time.

As the thieves’ ever-increasing appetite for loot inevitably keep growing (after all, the only way to get your hands on more without producing anything of value, is to find new ways to take from others); this will become more and more pertinent. Amongst other things driving demand for crypto currencies and other harder to shake down payment mechanisms. As well as anonymized communications, purely digital (hard to link to the kind of physical person/organization the robbers can easily intimidate) identities etc.

Kinuachdrach
Kinuachdrach

If the Europeans had a backbone, they would be leading the charge to make sure Iran does not develop nuclear weapons. They are, after all, a much closer, more likely target for the actual use of Iranian nuclear weapons.

Contrarian_Ed
Contrarian_Ed

Germany's problem (and thus the EU's problem) is that they have a much bigger trade surplus with the US than trade that they plan to have with Iran. A country like the US with trade deficits has the advantage in trade wars (and withdrawing from the JCPOA is a type of trade conflict).

Contrarian_Ed
Contrarian_Ed

Germany's problem (and thus the EU's problem) is that they have a much bigger trade surplus with the US than trade that they plan to have with Iran. A country like the US with trade deficits has the advantage in trade wars (and withdrawing from the JCPOA is a type of trade conflict).

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