Labour Slaughtered, Corbyn Refuses to Admit He is the Reason

Mish

Jeremy Corbyn led Labour to a crushing defeat. He blames everyone but himself.

The UK election is over. Those expecting a hung parliament that found out otherwise in a record 5 seconds.

The exit polls were not only astonishing, they were astonishingly accurate. The exit poll Tory estimate was 368.

With 648 of 650 seats announced, the results look like this.

My "Fearless Forecast" was Tories 345, Labour 226, and Lib Dems 17.

Apologies offered for not being optimistic enough.

What Happened?

I can sum up the blowout result in a set of Tweets from Andrew Adonis, a Labour peer, diehard Remainer. and former cabinet minister under Gordon Brown.

Plain as Day

The key idea was in the polls from beginning to end.

Flashback November 18: Fear of Corbyn Outweighs Fear of Brexit

My Comment: "This election is no longer primarily about Brexit, it's primarily about Corbyn."

Perhaps this is easier to see from afar. Perhaps it is simple willingness to dive into the polls. Either way, Corbyn's unpopularity was of epic proportion, poll after poll after poll.

Why is it shocking news that people, when they finally got into the voting booth, voted against someone they could not stand?

Second Reason

Adonis gets the second reason too. I will rephrase things my way: Corbyn is a Marxist who let (if not encouraged) the party to be hijacked by radical left activists the average person simply cannot believe.

Both reasons point squarely at Corbyn.

Size of the Swings

Jo Swinson is Gone

Party rules say Liberal Democrat Jo Swinson must stand down.

I offer a musical tribute.

Jeremy Corbyn Steps Down

Earlier tonight Jeremy Corbyn announced he was standing down. But he refused to say when. He wants to "reflect on the result".

Reflect on This

Corbyn blamed Brexit. He blamed the media. He blamed disgusting politicians.

On the latter, he is of course correct. He just forgot to look in the mirror while making that statement.

Corbyn Already Sounds Like Hillary

Corbyn is whining as loudly as Hillary Clinton.

He just forgot one thing. He forgot to blame Russia.

He will have plenty of time to reflect on things, then blame Russia.

Faith Restored

Mike "Mish" Shedlock

Comments (61)
No. 1-27
Six000mileyear
Six000mileyear

The EU has lost any leverage in dealing with Brexit.

Gulliverfoyle
Gulliverfoyle

Boris now needs to tell the EUSSR

give Us a FTA

or F**K OFF

Sechel
Sechel

In the end B.J. proved masterful. He may look like Donald Trump but he's way more tactical, disciplined and frankly smart. He even thanked those who voted for him who normally support the other party and acknowledged they may go back.

djwebb1969
djwebb1969

The reason is that Labour did not hold the Conservatives to account over their failure on Brexit - but were even more anti-the popular view. Had Labour been pro-Brexit and pointed out all the betrayals in Johnson's deal, it would be very different. As it is, the dream of a sovereign Britain has now died.

lamlawindy
lamlawindy

Congrats to you, Mish, for an insightful prediction, and congrats to Boris for his strategic decision --which was not without risk-- to go to the voters when his Brexit plan was stymied.

Regarding the Scotland results: it appears that anti-Tory sentiment has hardened; I'm fairly certain the SNP will have a near-permanent lock on Scotland. IMHO, Boris should give Nicola Sturgeon her wish: hold #indyref2 & stay out of that campaign. Until that time, the SNP will be a thorn in Boris's side, with a caucus of about 10% of Westminster MPs, due to Irish abstentionism. If #indyref2 fails, the SNP are silenced. If it succeeds, then around 50 opposition MPs will be gone. Either is a win-win for her Majesty's Government, in my book.

djhowls
djhowls

Boris and Cummings played the shambolic fools for the last 6 months on purpose. Making Parliament the enemy was a masterstroke

Harry-Ireland
Harry-Ireland

I'm trying so hard to not relish in the utter defeat of the remainers and the lunatic left. I'm trying, but failing miserably :)

JLS
JLS

I can disagree with Mish now and again, and I disagree that Corbyn has been keeping British voters awake and more than climate change or impeachments or LGBXYZ.

People want a resolution for Brexit (regardless of how they voted in 2016). They want to be able to get on with their lives with reasonable certainty of what tomorrow will bring: good, bad, or indifferent can be coped with if it can be met head on. Labour (all of the leadership) have come across as a bunch of whiny school kids, unfit to drive go kart without trying to wrest the wheel from one another.

ksdude69
ksdude69

Wow, makes Toxic Hillary look good lol. Of course, Hillary will have a hard time staying away from the prom queen contest as greedy as she is.

magoomba
magoomba

Drat. This absurd business of democracy and voting has really gone too far. It should have been done away with a long time ago.

JustASimpleMan
JustASimpleMan

Anyone heard from Avidremainer? Is he on suicide watch?

magoomba
magoomba

Well the peasants have voted to get rid of the EU and the muslims.

magoomba
magoomba

Ironically, after rejecting the generous supposed offering of alms from 'labour', the peasantry woke to find that what little currency they had in their pockets increased in value too.

Anda
Anda

#Itwastherussians #Secondelection #Ididntvoteforthem #Theresasaleatpennys

BaronAsh
BaronAsh

Well done, Mish, and you deserve to enjoy your victory lap.

I got bored with the election because Boris (and JRM) were playing it super-safe and super-simple, so they avoided complex discussions or controversial comments, which obviously, worked very well. But it was a surprisingly boring campaign.

That said, I think you are a little over the top with the Corbyn argument. Clearly, his unpopularity was a major factor. But I think this is in no small part due to the cleverness of the positions Boris (and Cummings) deliberately took. They deliberately offered a clear path forward, both in the short and long term, and also clearly contrasted their path with the opposition's, which was unclear. Put simply, they said (again and again and again): vote for us and our oven-ready package will be popped in the oven in December and this whole thing will be done and dusted in January, end of story. Vote for our opponents and you have at least 6 months of wrangling with no end in sight and also Scotland will have a referendum to break up the Union with all the chaos and ill-will that will entail.

So it's not just that Corbyn was bad: the Tories offered a far more clarifying, hopeful and comprehensive vision of the future.

They have a big challenge in terms of not only getting a good Brexit arrangement with the EU, but also saving the Union. Ireland is perhaps doomed for natural cultural and geographic reasons, but that remains to be seen (who knows, in 20 years Eire might join the UK again instead of being exploited by the EU banksters). But Scotland is relatively easy: the last referendum was once in a generation, promised by all involved. So Boris can simply refuse to grant permission for a referendum and argue that they should wait at least until Brexit is finished and the UK has a chance to function independently for 10 years or so. He might lose that argument in the Courts, but it won't be easy: all sides agreed to the once-in-a-generation thing only a few years ago, so what's the problem with waiting another 15 years? None.

Meanwhile, Boris has a shot at reviving the modern equivalent of the Commonwealth, playing a leading role in the Great Game Maritime Team which includes India, Japan, Australia, NZ, USA for starters, and perhaps many more coming through in Africa, Hong Kong and so forth with the English contributions. Culturally, we might see a boom in UK media productions, both movies, TV's and intellectual input. It could be a very dynamic time if they prevent the EU stodge-masters from bogging them down in red tape. Boris is a decent manager, but not a red tape slogger, so expect some sort of rapid, over-arching solution, not years of stultifying negotiations.

Anyway, my point is: the Tories offered a very clear and very uplifted choice. That bright light put Corbyn in rather wretched-looking shade. Their role in framing Corbyn should not be overlooked. It was a masterfully run campaign from the day he took over the Premiership demonstrating the ability to form and hold a vision, and then execute with both daring and patience. Very impressive.

BaronAsh
BaronAsh

All the defectors lost their seats. So this wasn't just about Corbyn.

Personally, he seemed to me completely out of touch, a 'yesterday's man' marching a la 1970's when he was young. I think he regarded Brexit as a big wave crashing on the beach which was bigger and taking longer than he liked, but which would soon be gone and then things would return to normal. But it isn't that, it's a once-in-a-generational shift, and he didn't have the vision or guts to see that.

RonJ
RonJ

"Those expecting a hung parliament that found out otherwise in a record 5 seconds."

Who was pushing that propaganda?

I was flipping through channels a few days ago, stopping a moment at Bloomberg TV, where i got the impression that the race had tightened and there could indecisive outcome. Was it honest reporting, or was it meant to influence the outcome of the election?

A recent Reuters poll on sentiment for impeachment, way over sampled democrats. If i remember correctly, 529 democrats, 385 republicans and 111 independents were surveyed. Hardly, a fair poll.

Mish
Mish

Editor

@lamlawindy is essentially correct, but the timing is off.

Boris needs to negotiate a good deal with the EU first, then let things settle down. Then if SNP still demands a referendum give it to them.

Nicola will be in a world of hurt.

  1. The EU would demand fishing rights
  2. There would be a hard border and Scotland would have to pay for it
  3. Scotland would have to adopt the EURO

Imagine the scare campaign one could mount against that. And it would be real, not made-up.

Finally, because of all those things, I do not think the EU would even go along.

So yes, let her have that damn referendum, but only after Johnson's negotiations keep UK fishing rights.

Mish

Maximus_Minimus
Maximus_Minimus

I can't savor this the way some do, but I do savor how the B(P)BC cheered for remain and lost (they still see those tightening polls). The last time I visited the B(P)BC was when they shut down their comment section...because of comments they didn't like.

GruesomeHarvest
GruesomeHarvest

Perhaps Corbyn's row with the "Israel Firsters" played a big part. After all to criticize Israel for their disproportional use of force is considered antisemitism.

tz3
tz3

Socialism and socialists can never be wrong or responsible for any failure. That is why Corbyn won't resign.

Mish
Mish

Editor

Corbyn will resign in January - A given

bilejones
bilejones

To continue the “Boris won because of the quality of the opposition” theme

This is Labour’s Home Secretary to be:

Pater_Tenebrarum
Pater_Tenebrarum

Assuming Johnson does get Brexit done (and it seems he will), this will be the first time ever that a popular vote that went against the EU is actually respected (as opposed to "repeated until the result is to the EU's liking"). It is actually quite a monumental event for that reason alone. And I think its importance is still underestimated. The EU now loses one of its biggest net payers. The remaining net payers henceforth will have to shoulder a far bigger financial burden to continue subsidizing the have-nots (and French farmers). I cannot imagine that this will be a friction-free affair. Particularly as the UK is bound to unleash the kind of tax and regulatory competition that is anathema to the socialist high tax "harmonizers" and centralizers running the bureaucratic Moloch in Brussels.


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