Michigan Legalizes Recreational Marijuana, Utah and Missouri Ease Restrictions

National laws are in need of a serious overhaul as states take matters into their own hands.

In midterm election votes, Michigan, Utah, and Missouri Eased Restrictions on Marijuana.

There are now 33 U.S. states that have legalized marijuana to some degree, and recreational pot use is now legal in 10 states, along with Washington, D.C. But possessing, selling or using marijuana remains illegal under federal law.

Coming into the Nov. 6 vote, both Michigan and North Dakota already had medical marijuana laws in place. Utah and Missouri didn't have far-reaching legislation on the books, though Missouri had lightened the potential penalties for first-time offenses.

Four Proposals, Three Passed

  • "Michigan residents over 21 years old will soon be able to buy, possess, use, and grow marijuana," reports member station Michigan Radio, which adds that Proposal 1's backers will now focus on trying to expunge criminal records related to nonviolent marijuana cases. The measure passed 55 to 45.
  • In Missouri, St. Louis Public Radio reports that Amendment 2 would impose a 4 percent tax on sales of medical marijuana, with the funds used to pay for the program. Any overage would go to the state's veterans commission. The station adds, "For the most part, there was no opposition arguing against the idea of medical marijuana." The measure passed 65.5 to 34.5.
  • North Dakota's Measure 3 would have required "the expungement of all marijuana-related convictions," Prairie Public Broadcasting reports. But critics said it went too far. The North Dakota Association of Counties opposed the measure, saying it lacked limits on how much marijuana one person could grow. It also said the state is still struggling to implement the 2016 measure that legalized medical use. The measure failed 59.5 to 40.5
  • In Utah, Gov. Gary Herbert and key legislators were already working to frame a medical marijuana bill that is similar to Proposition 2, with the intention of passing it regardless of how Tuesday's vote turned out, Utah Public Radio reports. Those backing the plan to approve medical use include the Mormon church. The measure passed 53 to 47.

The Federal government is seriously out of touch.

Mike "Mish" Shedlock

Comments (28)
No. 1-11
KidHorn
KidHorn

I'm mixed on the issue. One the one hand, pot is safer than alcohol and if alcohol is legal, pot should be too. On the other, combining pot and alcohol is far more dangerous than alcohol alone. At least from what I've read from driving accident records.

shamrock
shamrock

Here's hoping Trump and the new congress can get together to end wars at home against our own citizens and abroad in the middle east. Not holding breath.

SMF
SMF

In California, you'd figure that make pot legal would eliminate certain enforcement action. You'd be wrong.

Law enforcement is now fighting those scoundrels who have decided that it is cheaper for them not to become legal (100,000s in initial expense plus about 45% tax overall) for illegal pot.

stillCJ
stillCJ

Editor

"The Federal government is seriously out of touch." Indeed it is, and has been for a long time. The DEA still considers pot as bad as heroin or meth. Obama promised to fix that problem, then ignored it and did nothing. He lied! Shocking!

JL1
JL1

Trump just fired Attorney General Sessions who hated Marijuana and wanted to keep it illegal...

MntGoat
MntGoat

I mixed on this too. I agree with KidHorn alcohol is far more destructive than pot IMO. But pot can be a pretty powerful psychedelic drug. I do not do pot, but just to try it out I went into a recreational pot store and tried some edibles and it really whacked me out mentally. If you go heavier on the CBD and less on the THC it has less psychedelic effects and more of body high then mental high. But the fact that its so easy for young people to get powerful psychedelic drugs like that worries me . And I did smoke some pot occasionally with friends in my college years but never really liked it that much. People I knew who smoked pot heavily were not exactly big achievers. Many wasted their lives and it impeded their success and motivation, and became a daily crutch.

I generally lean towards legalization, and like the decriminalization aspects of it. But generally I think outside of medical, I don't think its this great thing for young people.

gregggg
gregggg

Mike Mish Shedlock
Mike Mish Shedlock

Editor

Promises Promises Obama broke many: Cuba and Afghanistan the worst of the lot Trump did not break this issue - but he is hugely on the wrong side of it.

wootendw
wootendw

Heavy users of cannabis, who would prefer to be just casual users but have difficulty leaving their stash untouched, should consider one of these:

MorrisWR
MorrisWR

My profession for 20 years was as a forensic research Toxicologist (last 10 years in Molecular Biology). Medical science has proven Cannabinoids to be medically benificial yet the Federal Government (DHHS, NIDA, SAMHSA, etc) continue to ignore the data. There is also no Constitutional basis for the Feds to keep it as an illegal substance, especially Schedule 1.

Top-GUN
Top-GUN

Two thoughts,,, States are legalizing pot for revenue purposes. Want to do pot go ahead,,,, but I don't want you on my job site, in government or anywhere else making decisions that affect me, driving anything anywhere, and I don't want to pay for your health care ....