Percentage of Healthcare Uninsured Jumps From 8.0% in 2017 to 9.1% in 2019

-edited

A census report on health insurance coverage shows the first increase in the number of uninsured since Obamacare.

The Census report on Health Insurance Coverage in the United States shows the number of uninsured jumped from 8.0 percent in 2017 to 8.5 percent in 2018 then again to 9.1% as of March 2019.

2018 vs 2017 Healthcare Insurance

Age Factor

Key Points

  • For children, coverage overall decreased by 0.6 percentage points (to 94.5 percent), and public coverage declined by 1.3 percentage points (to 35.7 percent). The latter change was likely due to a 1.2 percentage-point decrease in Medicaid and CHIP coverage.
  • In 2018, people in households with lower income had lower health insurance coverage rates than people in households with higher income.
  • In 2018, 86.2 percent of people in households with an annual income of less than $25,000 had health insurance coverage, compared with 96.8 percent of people in households with income of $150,000 or more.

The above bullet points are from the article.

Age Group 19-25

Obamacare forced this age group to overpay.

Millennials are bright enough to figure this out and some are willing to take the risk of no insurance.

Age Group 45-64

The uninsured in age group 45-64 are probably scared to death and praying they can make it until then. Those opting out do so for cost reasons.

Age Group 65+

Medicare is an easy choice, so this group is insured.

Some Blame Trump

Politico notes Number of uninsured Americans rises for the first time since Obamacare.

"Prior to the Trump administration assuming office, reducing the number of uninsured children was a national success story," said Joan Alker, executive director of the group, which has supported the ACA and other coverage programs. "Unless things change immediately, this progress is at risk – and our children and their families will pay the price."

“President Trump’s cruel health care sabotage has left two million more people without health insurance, forced to live in constant fear of an accident or injury that could spell financial ruin for their families," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a statement.

Middle Class Squeeze

It's easy to blame Trump for everything, so many do. It goes with the territory.

Republican policies are responsible for some of the increase. But what percentage?

Brian Blase, a former White House official who helped steer the administration's efforts to expand cheaper health insurance plans, pointed out the Census found a statistically significant increase in the uninsured rate for people earning more than 400 percent of the federal poverty line. That is the eligibility cutoff for for Obamacare subsidies for those purchasing their own coverage in the law's marketplaces. The finding speaks to the trouble middle-class families face in affording Obamacare plans, Blase said.

"People above 400 percent of the poverty line, premiums are really expensive for them," he said.

The statistics support multiple reasons, especially Republican states, not Trump alone.

Too Expensive

Some comments the Wall Street Journal on the Rising Number of Uninsured support the "too expensive" thesis.

“As the economy continues to slowly improve, people’s incomes were maybe going up a bit and that was enough to pull them out of Medicaid but not enough for job-based coverage,” said Rachel Garfield, a vice president at the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation.

“It’s just too expensive,” said Grace-Marie Turner, president of the Galen Institute, a public-policy free-market research organization. “People are siphoning themselves off.”

Medicaid Expansion

  • The uninsured rate in 2018 rose by 0.6 percentage point in states that expanded Medicaid, to 3.5%, for people living at or above 400% of poverty, or about $80,000 for a family of three, according to the census data.
  • It rose 1.7 percentage points to 6.2% in states that didn’t expand Medicaid for this group.

The uninsured rate was up across the board, but more so for states that did not expand Medicaid.

Ultimately, states are responsible for decisions on expanding Medicaid and some Republican-led states did just that.

Medicaid expansion is ultimately a state decision, not a Trump decision.

Screwed Generation

I cannot help returning to this key stat: "Among adults aged 19 to 64, the youngest group, up to age 25, was among the most likely to be uninsured, according to the census data. That demographic had an uninsured rate of 14.3%."

That's the screwed generation.

Obamacare forced the healthy young to overpay.

By design, Obamacare forced the young and healthy to subsidize the obese, the smokers, and the terminally ill.

14.3% of them said screw it. And who can blame them?

So much for forced risk sharing.

Mike "Mish" Shedlock

Comments (95)
No. 1-18
Sechel
Sechel

Problem is if you remove healthy people from the mix you're left with older sick people and the risk of that pool is such that you can't deliver good pricing. Problem is you can't charge obese and smokers more for insurance. It's illegal!

I had this conversation with one of my doctors. I'm a proponent of the swiss system where people have high deductibles are required to get a basic insurance policy from a free market(but regulated) provider and then voluntarily opt to get a more expensive premium policy for things not mandated by the state. For those below a certain income level they get a tax credit from the State. The difference is Switzerland has a very restrictive immigration system. To move to Switzerland you must prove you are independently wealthy or have a job waiting for you. In the United States we have large groups on welfare or below the poverty level.

And even for those people you think can take a chance if they show up at the hospital they cannot be refused so the hospital jacks up their other rates and we all wind up paying but in the most inefficient way possible.

2banana
2banana

We Grubered some folks.

"For people who already have insurance, and the employers who are providing it, we will work to lower your premiums by up to $2,500 per family.” -- obama 2008

Latkes
Latkes

The US has the worst health insurance system in the developed world.

Tony Bennett
Tony Bennett

Spotlight needs to be on why costs so high, not who pays.

Cheesie
Cheesie

Blow the whole system up. It is only recently that we let the medical industrial complex have so much power in our society. Outcomes dont match expenditures. Problem started with the introduction of health insurance itself.

THX1138
THX1138

Obama and his congressional criminal cronies sold ACA as a solution to the uninsured problem. It's a mandate now that people have insurance. John Roberts and the other liberals on the supreme court backed it. This is a non starter now. Problem solved. No one gets to hem and haw about the "uninsured" anymore.

Bam_Man
Bam_Man

So doctors and insurance executives can drive Mercedes Benz and Porsches.

Realist
Realist

Agree with Latkes. The US has a terrible system.

Tony Bennett. Costs are almost double what many countries pay. Why? Partly because the system is so fragmented (that’s why many countries use single-payer); partly because profits must be built-in to the system for private providers (which is why most countries try to avoid privatization of healthcare); partly because Democrats and Republicans keep changing the system depending on who is in charge, which results in constant upheaval and additional costs for providers who have to keep adapting to these constant changes.

Some here will tell you the only reason costs are high is because Americans don’t look after themselves. That is also true in other countries. It is not unique to the US.

As I frequently say; the US will eventually adopt single payer, but not till they try everything else for the next 20 years. Until the, expect health care costs to keep going up and the number of insured to keep going down.

Carlos_
Carlos_

No Mish Trump is %100 responsible of this. Let me remind you: "Repeal and replace" promised for years no. Another thing: "promises made promises kept". Really? I only see the ones he made to his billionaire friends and to corporations. The little people better get ready because it will get much worst for them. BTW like I said before Trump is being walked into a war with Iran. And no it is not the deep state. If there is a war with Iran is because he started the ball rolling when rejecting the nuclear deal. But heck I know you will vote for him again.

abend237-04
abend237-04

The fear of death is a huge motivator and accounts for most of the successful rent-seeking by our medical industrial complex today. Certainly, nothing in the data supports our nearly-two-trillion-annual burn rate. Spain, and others, routinely produce better health results with dramatically lower spending per capita.

Anyone still believing the indigent lack access to healthcare in this country probably hasn't been to a hospital emergency care facility in several decades.

Healthcare promises are always good political campaign fodder. Vote for just the right demagogue and you might live forever.

SMF
SMF

So many misconceptions about healthcare...

  1. Doctors have to order all sorts of tests to avoid liability. Most will be unnecessary.
  2. End of life care takes a good chunk of that money. The father of a friend had a major operation at age 89, which ruined his quality of life for years afterwards. Family members often don't or can't let go.
  3. Regulations, never saw so many idle people milling about the hospital during my stay. Not to mention the building regulations required for a hospital to keep running.
  4. There is money in private medical practice in Europe, think about that for a moment.
  5. Learn about what other systems in the world are really about before forming an opinion. Most would be surprised about results.
Country Bob
Country Bob

Talk about focusing on the wrong metric! It matters whether people can get access to health care (doctors, medicine, etc), not whether they have access to a corrupt financing scheme.

All of the people who dropped insurance had and still have the option to buy Obamacare. They chose to drop it. Some because public housing healthcare is repulsive, but the overwhelming majority dropped coverage because Obamacare is unaffordable.

F Obama. F Pelosi. F that bastard MIT sh!thead Gruber. And F all the socialists who shoved this corruption down our throats. Medical insurance started under socialist FDR, and every time these miserable socialists get a chance, they make the system worse and worse and worse.

When the nobel peace price -sshole wasn't starting wars, he was making a messed up healthcare system 1000000x worse, all while exempting himself.

avidremainer
avidremainer

How much would it cost for a health plan that once paid there were no further claims on the insured?

JohnH
JohnH

Obamacare is a nightmare!

For my wife and I premiums for the cheapest Obummercare plan is $13,000 a year, with a $6,500 deductible each. That means if we both needed it, we would need to spend $26,000 per year before we got a penny back!

I am a doctor that practices natural medicine with 25+ years of experience and I can tell you that the vast majority of medical intervention is unnecessary and destroys peoples health. It is all about the money.

avidremainer
avidremainer

OK guys, I asked a question and nobody answered. There are a couple of assumptions that could be made. 1) you can't be arsed to answer me. 2) None of you on this site can afford to pay for a fully comprehensive health care package with no copays or deductibles at point of need. 3) You need to have tens of millions in America to have a comprehensive medical plan? Hundreds of millions? More? For the life of me most of your arguments on here are about as useful as the proverbial angels on a pinhead. Have you allgone off your heads?

bradw2k
bradw2k

Congress approved tax exemptions for employer-paid health care benefits in the 50's. Six decades later a full third of "the system" is full-retard socialism (Medicare + Medicaid + VA = 34%). At this point no one can imagine let alone remember what a free market in medical care and true insurance looks like. Every fix offered is a new set of regulations, and leaves less room for the individual's full liberty to dispose of his or her own property.

The individual is rarely even mentioned today. Notice all of the statism-zombies even on this site who can tell us about the AGGREGATE medical expenses for different countries, but are completely silent on the issues of individual sovereignty and property rights. Spoiler: they do not think about nor value the individual. At all. I presume it's because the requisite brain cells have withered and died through decades of neglect and abuse.

thimk
thimk

folk's there is a lot of blame to go around. don't forget the feds interest rate repression that enabled massive mergers and cartel formations with oligopoly pricing. didn't walmart buy humana ?

SmokeyIX
SmokeyIX

I'm an American and I'll be moving from South Korea to the USA in October. I've spent 7 of the last 13 years in Korea and health insurance is always the best thing about living in South Korea and the worst thing about living in the USA. I pay around $100 a month for national health insurance, there are no deductibles and no annual deductibles, there are no pre-existing conditions, it's accepted at all clinics and hospitals, and the national health insurance never tries to weasel out of covering surgeries or anything. It's non-profit and amazing. Now I have to go back to the corrupt American insurance where the deductibles are so high things rarely get covered, one insurance company tried to refuse to cover a trip to the ENT specialist because they said a vasectomy was a pre-existing condition, some doctors and clinics don't accept some patients with some insurances, and if I'm in an emergency situation, I may have to decide whether to go to the ER of a hospital that doesn't accept my insurance or roll the dice and drive a longer distance to one that does accept my insurance. When I was in the general ward for three nights in South Korea (fully covered by national health insurance) there was another patient there, a South Korean citizen, who had flown from Atlanta to have a non-emergency operation. My appendectomy cost around $300 since I had insurance. If I wouldn't have had insurance, it would've cost around $1,200. It's unreal how corrupt the USA is, especially hospitals and insurance companies. If that's the best the "Bible Belt" can do, it doesn't say much for the deities in the Abrahamic religions.