Replacing Cashiers With Robots "Just Makes Sense" Jack-in-the-Box CEO

As minimum wages rise, so does the push to get rid of workers.

Leonard Comma, CEO of Jack-in-the-Box says the company is considering swapping some cashiers for self-ordering kiosks . "It just makes sense to consider replacing cashiers with machines as minimum wages rise," said Comma.

Jack in the Box previously tested technology such as kiosks. According to Comma, the kiosks resulted in a higher average check and helped with efficiency. But at the time Comma said the cost of installing the kiosks wasn't worth it.

Jack in the Box isn't the only fast-food chain that has considered using automation to reduce labor costs and modernize.

Wendy's announced plans to install self-ordering kiosks within a year. McDonald's is adding kiosks to 2,500 stores, though it pledged not to replace cashiers with kiosks.

"With government driving up the cost of labor, it's driving down the number of jobs," then Carl's Jr. and Hardee's CEO Andy Puzder told Business Insider in 2016. "You're going to see automation not just in airports and grocery stores, but in restaurants."

You can have $15. But it will be at the expense of hours and jobs.

Pizza Hut Delivery Vehicle

Does anyone think this thing will fly?

Mike "Mish" Shedlock

Comments
No. 1-25
KnotchoLibre
KnotchoLibre

No @KidHorn, people will plug in their cars whenever the feel like it, but the cars have the option to be scheduled to charge at night. This already exists on the Tesla and it's rocket science to do, even for a cheap company like Chevy.
As for the problems already being seen, I'm sure there are going to be many but they can all be managed and smoothed out as has been discussed probably a decade ago - but it takes time for ideas to be implemented. A few of the ideas were: modify daytime charging @ work to a trickle charge so the demand is not the typical 6.6Kw but something much slower (eg: 1Kw) to get a charge by the time you leave and not ASAP.
The total power demand for EV, compared to the entire electrical supply is not that large, it's just in the wrong places and not wired for it. I did some rough numbers and found it was <2% annual production. I only did this because I couldn't find any studies, just opinions. If you have studies, I'm interested. Arc furnaces tend to be wired for the power consumption. You'll find the even the high power demand of Tesla SuperChargers are wired specifically for that demand whereas local J1776 chargers that are shoehorned into malls and parking structures are not planned out.

KidHorn
KidHorn

So you think people are going to get up at midnight and plug in their cars. Not going to happen. People will plug them in when they get from from work. The same time Air conditioning at their homes is running and then they'll go in the kitchen to cook dinner. Problems are already surfacing in some municipalities that have a relatively large number of electric vehicles, bit still under 5% of the total number of cars.

KidHorn
KidHorn

@KnotchoLibre "You can find a lot of articles about the extra load on the power grid with a 100% EV US Market. Bottom line: it's not that bad, especially when you consider that 99% of the vehicles can recharge on off hours actually smoothing out energy demand."

CautiousObserver
CautiousObserver

Also to clarify, the "extra tissue" - adipose tissue (loose fat not associated with muscle), connective tissue, tendon, blood vessel, nerve tissue...etc., is not present in simple ground chuck in the quantities which it was found in the study mentioned. My understanding was that the extra tissue is being used as a filler.

CautiousObserver
CautiousObserver

Obvious mistake there. I meant to say 36% of ground chuck is muscle tissue with 44% being water.