This may be the ONE thing that George Soros and I agree upon. Markets are typically not right. They go to an excess (both to the upside and the downside, neither of which are long-term accurate views) and the market eventually reverts back to "the truth" which is a fair valuation, which he refers to as "reflexivity". If the "efficient market hypothesis" worked, then there would never be "values" to be had and never be a way to "beat the market" over time. By the way, my goal is to "beat inflation" which is your real enemy of your purchasing power, more so than "beating the market". What we need is for our purchasing power to be preserved (as goal 1) and for our purchasing power to gain value into the future (as goal 2). .

Comments (4)
No. 1-3
joeadele2003
joeadele2003

I believe most everything is out of kilter with,money in the world these days..most things seem to be volatile. It is hard to find confidence to take a chance when you are the little fish in the big pond and the pond is polluted...But I find trust and confidence with your service and have taken a more relaxed approach with your guidance.

Sean Hyman
Sean Hyman

Editor

For me, fundamentals give me all the confidence I need. And volatility is the value investor’s friend because it creates opportunities for us as others that don’t know what they’re invested in, run away.

kenatech
kenatech

The main difference between us and Soros is that when we buy or sell, our actions are so small that they do not affect the market, but when he buys or sells, the size of his trades is large enough have a significant effect on the price of a stock.